In 2013 whilst out walking in the area Alan Richards found a row of stones at Graig Fawr. Recently he approached us to see what we thought about them. A site visit on the 12th August 2021 confirmed the presence of at least 96 small and medium sized stones leading away from a ring cairn […]

A new Google Map showing the location of individual stones in the rows has been created using existing plans with the data being transferred manually to the Google Map.  In most instances, whilst time consuming, the result has been satisfactory but sometimes a small amount of distortion may have occurred.  Over time it may be […]

The most common type of stone row is short single rows composed of less than 10 large-sized stones. Callanish, West is one 37 short single rows composed of less than 10 large-sized stones. This type of stone row is mainly found in Scotland although there a few examples in Wales and South West England. Simplified […]

Stone rows measuring more than 200m long are never straight, are often sinuous and sometimes have marked curves or shifts in orientation. A shift in orientation at Hingston Hill stone row on Dartmoor. View from Stalldown of the Upper Erme stone row (highlighted by the white line). Meandering just about covers it.  By contrast the […]

All minilithic stone rows measuring more than 50m long are found in South West England. The minithic row at White Ladder on Exmoor measures 420m long and consists of at least 164 tiny stones. Information on minilithic rows can be found here. Previously Did you know that…. 1. The Upper Erme stone row on Dartmoor […]

Single stone rows composed exclusively of small stones are only found in South West Britain. Carneglos stone row on Bodmin Moor is one of the “minilithic” single rows found in South West Britain. Most are in South West England but there are two in South Wales. More information can be found here. Tiny stones barely […]

The lowest stone rows in Great Britain are Yelland in Devon and Higher Town Bay, St Martin’s, Isles of Scilly which are both at sea level. The stone row at Yelland is now buried below estuarine mud (From Grinsell, L.V., 1970, 35). The Higher Town Bay stone row © Cheryl Straffon Previously Did you know […]

The highest stone row is at Cut Hill on Dartmoor. Cut Hill stone row on Dartmoor includes nine well-spaced large fallen orthostats. The Cut Hill stone row as well being one of the most recent discoveries is also the highest in Great Britain.  It stands 600m above sea level, nearly 100 metres higher than Conies […]

Hart Tor, North terminal cairn An article looking at the stone row terminal cairns has recently been uploaded and is available here. In Great Britain as whole 82 stone rows have terminal cairns at their upper end, 23 at their lower end and three have cairns at both ends. Most rows do not have terminal […]

Dartmoor distribution map showing stone rows, cairns, roundhouses, stone circle and reaves. Despite the fragmentary character of the evidence, preliminary geospatial analysis has demonstrated the nature of the relationship between the stone rows and other broadly contemporary remains on Dartmoor. The identification of possible separate “territories” where similar forms of row are exclusively found, the […]