Rest of Wales

Waun Oer in Snowdonia has extensive views of the sea.

The stone rows in the parts of Wales beyond the clusters in the Brecon Beacons and Mid Wales vary considerably, but all consist of at least three stones aligned along a common axis. Most of the alignments are of the single row type but a pair of multiple alignments in North Wales share more characteristics with those in Northern Scotland than anywhere else in Britain.  The stone size and numbers within the alignments varies considerably as does their lengths and some are directly associated with cairns.

Map showing location of Rest of Wales

 

Interactive map showing the location of rest of Wales stone rows. 

Rest of Wales stone alignments at a glimpse

Rest of Wales stone row plans

Simplified plans of the stone rows in rest of Wales. Scale for rows without separate one is in bottom right hand box. Click on image for a higher resolution image.

Rest of Wales stone rows in charts

Pie charts showing the proportions of different types of stone row in the rest of Wales and Great Britain. Click on image to see a higher resolution version.

Pie charts showing the proportions of different lengths of rest of Wales and British stone rows. Click on image to see a higher resolution version.

Pie charts showing the proportions of different numbers of stones recorded at rest of Wales and British stone rows. Click on image to see a higher resolution version.

Pie charts showing the proportions of different stone sizes recorded at rest of Wales and British stone rows. Click on image to see a higher resolution version.

Radar graphs showing the orientation of rest of Wales and British stone rows.

 

Rest of Wales stone rows in numbers
No. of alignments 13
Number of single alignments 12
Number of double alignments 0
Number of triple alignments 0
Number of multiple alignments 0
Number of combination alignments 1
Maximum length 1898m
Minimum length 5m
Average length 252m
Median length 78m
Longest row Fonllech
Shortest row Arthog
Total number of recorded stones 156
Average number of stones in each row 13
Alignments including small stones 6
Alignments including medium stones 7
Alignments including large stones 9
Average orientation 72.5°
Average altitude 228m
Highest row Mynydd Clywedog (479m)
Lowest row Penmeiddyn (94m)
Cairn at the top of alignment 2
Cairn at the bottom of alignment 2
Scheduled alignments 8
Individual Rows

A summary of information for the individual stone rows can be viewed by clicking on the site names below. Whilst it is believed that the existing information is accurate, mistakes inevitably occur and should you spot any your help in improving this resource would be much appreciated. Your help will of course be fully acknowledged. Please use the contact button to get in touch.

 

Arthog

A probable single stone row measuring 5m long, including four medium and large-sized stones situated on a north facing terrace with a restricted view of the nearby sea. The western part of the row is incorporated into a later kerbed cairn. A nearby quartz boulder represents an outlier. The row is orientated ENE to WSW and stands in an area with broadly contemporary standing stones, cairns a stone setting and another stone row.

 

 


Bryn Seward

A probable single stone row measuring 61m long, including at least five medium and large-sized stones standing up to 2.14m high, situated on a north facing slope with sea and landscape views and reveals. The row has been incorporated into a later field boundary and this has inevitably altered its character and form. The row is orientated east to west and an adjacent cairn blocks views to the sea. There are a number of broadly contemporary cairns, settlements and another stone row in the vicinity.

 

 


Fonllech

A probable single row measuring 1898m long, including nine mainly large stones situated on a prominent ridge overlooking the sea. The row is orientated north east to south west and leads from a kerbed cairn. Another cairn stands close to the lower south western end of the row. There are a number of land and seascape reveals along its length.

 

 


Gray Hill

A probable single stone row measuring 78.7m long, including 6 different sized stones situated on the upper south facing slope of a prominent hill. The row is orientated north west to south east and leads from one side of a kerbed cairn. A further cairn survives in the vicinity.

 

 

 

 


Harolds Stones

A probable single stone row measuring 13.7m long, including three large upright orthostats situated within a valley with a restricted viewshed. The row is orientated north east to south west and stands within a medieval township and later field system. The central stone has a pair of cup-marks on one face. There are no other broadly contemporary monuments within the vicinity although the stones are depicted on a nearby sundial erected in 1689.

 

 


Mynydd Clywedog

A single stone row measuring 123.6m long, including at least 10 small and medium-sized stones situated at the western foot of a pronounced ridge. The row is orientated north to south and protrudes from deep peat which means that the stones will be much bigger and others may be completely hidden. The row has a sea view reveal, a possible astronomical link and stands in the vicinity of cairns.

 

 

 

 


Parc y Meirw

A single stone row measuring at least 911m long, including at least eight large-sized orthostats situated on south and west facing slopes. Unequal spacing indicates that it is very likely that many more have been removed. The row is orientated ESE to WNW, has both sea and landscape reveals and may even have once extended further eastward. Traditionally the row has been seen as consisting of the four western stones which are set relatively close together.

 


Pen-Feidr-Coedan

A possible single stone row only known from a 1960’s Ordnance Survey record. A single recumbent slab was visible here in 2003 but it is not known whether formed part of the row. The site of this possible row was a short distance south of Pentre Ifan chambered tomb.


Penmeiddyn

A probable single stone row (possibly double in places) only known from a description in the Royal Commission Inventory. The row which has since been destroyed measured 79m long and consisted of about 54 stones. The four westernmost stones were about 1m high and other were much smaller with many just protruding through the surface. The row was situated on a south west facing slope, was orientated north east to south west and stood in the vicinity of standing stones and barrows.

 

 

 


Rhos Hafotty Carneddau

A probable single stone row measuring 272m long, including at least 14 medium and large-sized stones situated on an east facing slope with extensive landscape views and reveals. The stones are fairly evenly spaced though there are gaps particularly where it leads through deep peat. The row is orientated east to west and stands adjacent to a stone setting. There are a number of  broadly contemporary standing stones, cairns and another stone row in the vicinity.

 

 

 


Troed y rhiw

A possible single stone row only known from a description in the Royal Commission Inventory. The row which has since been destroyed measured 12.2m long and consisted of 24 contiguous, edge set stones with an average height of 0.60m leading from a stone circle formed by at least 12 stones. The row was situated on a west facing slope, was orientated east to west and stood in the vicinity of a stone pair and standing stone.

 

 

 


Waun Oer

A single stone row measuring 78m long, including at least 10 small, medium and large-sized stones standing up to 1.57m high, situated on a north west facing slope with extensive sea views and landscape reveals. The row is orientated ENE to WSW and there are several broadly contemporary cairns, settlements and another stone row in the vicinity.

 

 

 

 


White Moor

A possible single stone row measuring 20m long, situted on a west facing slope, orientated east to west has been reported in the literature. This site remains to be visited.


 

LAST UPDATED: 30th November 2018

 

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