Rest of Scotland

Torhousekie, East

The 13 stone alignments in the rest of Scotland are situated beyond the main clusters. These isolated examples unsurprisingly vary considerably, but all consist of at least three stones aligned along a common axis.  The alignments at Brodgar Farm and Broomend of Crichie are directly associated with henges whilst three at Torhousekie are situated close to stone circles. Indeed one of them is in the centre of a stone circle. In common with the identified Scottish regions the stones comprising the alignments are generally large.

Map showing location of Rest of Scotland 

 

Interactive map showing the distribution of stone rows in the rest of Scotland. 

Rest of Scotland stone alignments at a glimpse

Rest of Scotland stone alignment plans

Simplified plans of the stone alignments in the rest of Scotland. Scale for rows in top right hand box except where otherwise shown. Click on image to open a higher resolution version.

Rest of Scotland stone alignments in charts

Pie charts showing the proportions of different types of stone row in the rest of Scotland and Great Britain. Click on image to see a higher resolution version.

Pie charts showing the proportions of different lengths of rest of Scotland and British stone rows. Click on image to see a higher resolution version.

Pie charts showing the proportions of different numbers of stones recorded at rest of Scotland and British stone rows. Click on image to see a higher resolution version.

Pie charts showing the proportions of different stone sizes recorded at rest of Scotland and British stone rows. Click on image to see a higher resolution version.

Radar graphs showing the orientation of rest of Scotland and British stone rows.

Rest of Scotland stone alignments in numbers
No. of alignments 13
Number of single alignments 8
Number of double alignments 3
Number of triple alignments 1
Number of multiple alignments 0
Number of combination alignments 1
Maximum length 1130m
Minimum length 4.7m
Average length 184m
Median length 51m
Longest alignment Brodgar Farm
Shortest alignment Torhousekie, East
Total number of recorded stones 188
Average number of stones in each alignment 16
Alignments including small stones 1
Alignments including medium stones 5
Alignments including large stones 9
Average orientation 51°
Average altitude 57m
Median altitude 36.5m
Highest alignment Tom nan Carragh (206m)
Lowest alignment Brodgar Farm (3m)
Cairn at the top of alignment 1
Cairn at the bottom of alignment 0
Scheduled alignments 8
Individual Rows

A summary of information for the individual stone alignments can be viewed by clicking on the site names below.  Whilst it is believed that the existing information is accurate, mistakes inevitably occur and should you spot any your help in improving this resource would be much appreciated. Your help will of course be fully acknowledged. Please use the contact button to get in touch.

Auldearn

A single stone row measuring 76.2m long, including six widely spaced large-sized boulders leading south east from a kerbed cairn with surrounding berm. Originally this row would have had restricted views of the nearby sea.

 

 

 


Brodgar Farm

A probable single stone row measuring 1,130m long, leading between the stone circles known as the Ring of Brodgar and Stones of Stenness. Only four stones survive and there is a possibility that they relate to separate monuments rather than forming part of a single row.  The row is orientated north west to south east and stands within a particularly significant prehistoric landscape.

 

 

 


Broomend of Crichie, North

A probable double stone row known from a 1920’s account of the archaeology of this area. The row was situated on a terrace next to the River Don and is said to have stood between a concentric stone circle which has also been destroyed, but which is known from a 1780 map and the henge which still survives. The row would have been about 46m long, composed of large stones and orientated north to south. A second stone row leading from the henge partially survives.

 

 

 


Broomend of Crichie, South

A substantial double stone row (or avenue) measuring at least 457m long, originally including around 80 large stones of which only four now survive. The row is situated on a terrace next to the River Don, is orientated north to south and leads from a henge at its northern end. There were originally cairns and a concentric stone circle in the vicinity but these no longer survive.

 


Drumtroddan

A single stone row measuring 15m long, including three large orthostats situated on a south facing terrace with restricted views of the nearby sea. The north eastern stone measures up to 3.4m high and the other two are now recumbent. The stone spacing suggests that the row may have originally included at least five orthostats. The south western stone fell in 2010. The row is orientated north east to south west and stands in an area with rock art.

 

 


Dyke Row

A probable single stone row measuring 8.7m long, including one medium and two large-sized orthostats situated on a terrace adjacent to a busy main road. The stones stand up to between 1.7m and 0.7m high, arranged in height order with the tallest at the south. The row is orientated NNE to SSW and doubts concerning its identification revolve around its proximity to the road.

 


Giant’s Stones, Hamna Voe

A possible triple stone row measuring 56m long, including at least 17 different sized stones situated on west facing terrace. The row is orientated north east to south west.


Milton

A possible double stone row known at this location only from an early 19th century account by George Anderson which states there are “two rows of upright stones, thirty in number, forming a straight avenue or passage of two or three feet in width, and which probably conducted to some circle or tumulus now removed from off the adjoining field. The direction of these rows is from ENE to WNW, and the stones at the western end are considerably larger than the others”.

 

 

 


Rinns of Shurdimires

A possible single stone row measuring 17m long, including two large-sized orthostats and one medium-sized stones situated on a north facing slope. The row is orientated north to south.


The Shearers

A probable single stone row measuring at least 124m long, including 30 mainly medium and three  large-sized stones partly crossing a prominent ridge.  The row is sinuous in form, orientated east to west and sits within an historic field system. A nearby mound may represent a cairn. There are a number of landscape reveals. Uncertainty regarding its interpretation hinges on its proximity to an Iron Age fort and the possibility that it represents a robbed boundary wall similar to others known in the region. On balance a stone row interpretation seems most likely because no other boundaries of this type are known in the immediate vicinity, no relict bank is visible and the stone spacing is consistent.

 


Tom nan Carragh

A possible single stone row measuring 286m long, including three large upright orthostats and three recumbent slabs situated on a pronouced ridge adjacent to the River Spey. The three upright stones stand between 2.25m and 2m and the row is orientated north east to south west. The western recumbent stone has two or possible three cup-marks. The doubts regarding identification exist because it is possible that this represents a group of stone pairs.

 

 

 


Torhousekie, East

A single stone row measuring 4.7m long, including one medium and two large-sized orthostats situated on top of a small knoll overlooking Torhousekie stone circle. The stones stand up to between 1.09m and 0.7m high, arranged in height order with the tallest at the south west.  The row is orientated north east to south west and stands in the vicinity of several cairns, a stone circle and another stone row.

 


Torhousekie, stone circle

A probable single stone row measuring 6.4m long, including one medium and two large-sized orthostats situated in the middle of a stone circle. The stones stand up to between 1.14m and 0.48m high, with the smallest in the middle.  The row is orientated ENE to WSW and stands in the vicinity of several cairns and another stone row. It is possible that the stones formed part of a prehistoric structure of another type.

 


 

LAST UPDATED: 29th November 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements
%d bloggers like this: