Rest of England

Devil’s Arrows

The 24 stone alignments situated beyond the main English clusters are to be found in the north and south west of England.  Given the considerable geographical spread and variations in geology it is not surprising that there are considerable variations in their form and character. This group include a couple of alignments (Yelland and Higher Town Bay) situated on the coast providing graphic evidence for a rise in sea level since these monuments were constructed. The West Kennett and Beckhampton alignments leading from the Avebury henge represent examples on the fringes of the known distribution.

Map showing the location of the Rest of England

 

Interactive map showing the distribution of stone rows in the rest of England. 

Rest of England stone rows at a glimpse

Rest of England stone row plans

Simplified plans of the rest of England stone rows. Scale for sites without separate ones is on the right hand side of the third row.

Rest of England stone rows in charts

Pie charts showing the proportions of different types of stone row in the rest of England and Great Britain. Click on image to see a higher resolution version.

Pie charts showing the proportions of different lengths of rest of England and British stone rows. Click on image to see a higher resolution version.

Pie charts showing the proportions of different numbers of stones recorded at rest of England and British stone rows. Click on image to see a higher resolution version.

Pie charts showing the proportions of different stone sizes recorded at rest of England and British stone rows. Click on image to see a higher resolution version.

Radar graphs showing the orientation of rest of England and British stone rows.

Rest of England stone rows in numbers
No. of alignments 21
Number of single alignments 8
Number of double alignments 13
Number of triple alignments 0
Number of multiple alignments 0
Maximum length 3000m
Minimum length 2.2m
Average length 428m
Median length 62.4m
Longest alignment Shap
Shortest alignment Askham Fell Cairn
Total number of recorded stones 590
Average number of stones in each alignment 29.5
Alignments including small stones 3
Alignments including medium stones 7
Alignments including large stones 17
Average orientation 91°
Average altitude 153m
Highest alignment Askham Fell Cairn (316m)
Lowest alignment Yelland (0m)
Cairn at the top of alignment 0
Cairn at the bottom of alignment 1
Scheduled alignments 19
Individual Rows

A summary of information for the individual stone alignments can be viewed by clicking on the site names below.  Whilst it is believed that the existing information is accurate, mistakes inevitably occur and should you spot any your help in improving this resource would be much appreciated. Your help will of course be fully acknowledged. Please use the contact button to get in touch.

Askham Fell Cairn

A possible double stone row measuring 2.2m long, including 4 small-sized stones situated next to a kerbed cairn on gently rolling plateau. This site may represent a stone setting or other structure. The row is orientated north west to south east and stands in the vicinity of several cairns and another stone row.

 

 

 

 


Askham Fell

A double stone row measuring 208m long, including around 72 small and medium-sized stones leading from a kerbed cairn situated on a gentle east facing slope. The row is orientated north west to south east and stands in the vicinity of several cairns and a possible stone row.

 

 


Avebury Z feature

A probable single stone row measuring 24.85m long, including at least eight large-sized orthostats of which six remain standing and two are known only from socket holes situated in the South Circle at Avebury. The row is orientated north to south, and the presence of other stones in the immediate vicinity means that alternative explanations are possible, but interpretation as a stone row is consistent with the evidence. A visual link with nearby Silbury Hill has been observed.

 


Beckhampton Avenue

A substantial double row (or avenue) measuring 1300m long, originally including around 170 large-sized stones forming part of the Avebury ritual complex. The row is orientated ENE to WSW and leads between Avebury Henge and a stone setting known as The Cove. Only one stone remains but excavation has confirmed that the stones were originally placed at 15m intervals. A number of landscape reveals are known to exist along its length and there are large numbers of prehistoric sites in the vicinity.

 

 


Broome

A possible single stone row recorded at this location by John Aubrey in the 17th century is said to have consisted of a tall stone measuring more than 3m high from which extended a line of smaller stones. The row was destroyed in the 19th century but the field in which it stood is known as Longstones. The lack of a detailed description means it is not possible to be certain that this was a prehistoric stone row but on balance this interpretation seems likely.

 

 

 


Broomrigg A

A possible double stone row measuring 112m long, including six medium and large-sized orthostats leading from a stone circle situated on a gentle east facing slope. The row may however also represent a single row with two or possibly three outliers. The row is orientated north west to south east and stands in the vicinity of several cairns and two stone circles.

 

 

 


Devil’s Arrows

A single stone row measuring at least 174m long, originally including at least four large-sized stones situated on a level floodplain.  Only three stones remain, all are upright and stand between 6.9m and 5.51m high, arranged in height order with the tallest at the south.  The row is orientated NNW to SSE. The missing stone is said to have been cut up in 1620 to repair a nearby bridge.

 

 

 


Five Kings

A single stone row measuring 19m long, including four large upright orthostats situated on a narrow terrace on a south east facing slope. The stones stand up to between 1.3m and 2.15m high. A fifth slab situated to the north is now recumbent but may have once stood upright. The row is orientated ENE to WSW. The row is currently on the edge of forestry which restricts its outlook.

 


Higher Town Bay

A single stone row measuring 15m long, including three medium and large-sized stones situated on a sandy beach just below the present mean high water mark. The row is orientated east to west and stands in an area rich in Romano-Britsh settlement and funerary remains.


Kenidjack Common

A single stone row measuring 22m long, including four medium and large-sized orthostats each with a hole cut through their long side. The row is orientated ENE to WSW, stands in a rich archaeological landscape that includes several barrows and stone circles. It has definable visual links with the sea, nearby barrows and standing stones. A stone row composed entirely of holed stones is unique in Great Britain.

 

 


Lacra, North East

A double stone row measuring 49.8m long, including 10 medium and large-sized stones situated on a south facing slope with sea views in two directions.  The row leads uphill from a stone circle and is orientated ENE to WSW. There is a sea view reveal at the top of the row, three stone circles and another stone row in the vicinity.

 

 


Lacra, South West

A double stone row measuring 64.8m long, including 12 medium and large-sized stones situated within a small shallow valley with sea views in two directions.  The row leads uphill from a nearby stone circle and is orientated north east to south west. There is a sea view reveal at the top of the row, three stone circles and another stone row in the vicinity.

 

 


Longstone Farm

A probable single stone row that measured 70m long, including three large orthostats situated on a south west facing slope. The stones were recorded immediately before their removal in 1981. The row was orientated east to west and whilst it is possible that they were historic boundary markers a prehistoric stone row interpretation seems the most likely.

 

 

 

 


Nine Maidens

A single stone row probably measuring 729m long, including at least 10 large-sized orthostats situated on a south west facing slope with a sea view reveal at the upper end (NNE). The row is orientated NNE to SSW and most of the stones survive in a cluster at the southern end. The row stands near another row and several cairns.

 

 


Shap

A substantial double stone row (or avenue) measuring at least 3000m long, originally including possibly hundreds of large stones of which only 31 now survive. The row is situated in gently rolling countryside, is orientated north west to south east and leads from a stone circle at its southern end. Excavation around one stone revealed no dating material. There is at least one cairn in the vicinity but others have probably been removed.

 


Stanton Drew, North

A double row (or avenue) now measuring 31.6m long, including eight large-sized orthostats forming part of the Stanton Drew ritual complex. The row is orientated east to west and leads from the NE stone circle.

 

 

 

 


Stanton Drew, South

A double row (or avenue) measuring 89m long, including six large-sized orthostats forming part of the Stanton Drew ritual complex. The row is orientated ENE to WSW and leads from the Great stone circle towards the northern row.

 

 

 


The Kirk

A probable double stone row measuring 54m long, including 7 medium-sized stones situated on a south facing slope with a sea view.  The row is very sinuous, leads uphill from a ring cairn and is orientated north to south. There is a second cairn in the vicinity and the row may have once extended to it.

 

 

 

 


Threestoneburn House

A probable double stone row measuring at least 60m long, including six medium and large-sized recumbent stones situated in a shallow valley.  The row leads northward from a stone circle. Only the southern stones are clearly visible and the others are hidden by dense vegetation. Other stones in the vicinity mean that it is not possible to be certain that this is a double or single stone row or even a fortuitous line of stones. On balance a stone row interpretation is probable because of the associated stone circle.

 


West Kennet Avenue

A substantial double row (or avenue) measuring 2500m long, originally including around 200 large-sized stones forming part of the Avebury ritual complex. The row is orientated north west to south east and leads between Avebury Henge and concentric stone circle known as The Sanctuary. A number of landscape reveals are known to exist along its length and there are large numbers of prehistoric sites in the vicinity.

 


Yelland

A double row measuring 34.5m long, including 22 small and medium-sized stones now buried below estuarine mud flats. The row is orientated north west to south east and maybe revealed again in the future.

 

 

 

 

 


 

LAST UPDATED 30th November 2018

 

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