Blathaisbhal (Blashaval)

© Copyright Marc Calhoun and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

Location

Scotland North Uist Western Isles NF 88793 71696
Lat 57.62754884   Long -7.21566544

Plan of Blathaisbhal stone row (Source: GPS survey by Sandy Gerrard).

Characteristics

Type: Single Length: 56.8m
No. of stones: 3 Size of stones: Only medium
Orientation: 107° Altitude: 49m
Upper end: – Lower end: –
Straight (Yes or No)  : No Sea View: Yes
Context:  –
Notes:

Other Information

Public Access:  Yes
Land Status:
Scheduled Ancient Monument: No

Identification

Category: Probable. It has been suggested that the stones may be of historic date because they stand parallel to a modern boundary fence.  They do not, but nevertheless the possibility of an historic date cannot be wholly dismissed. On balance despite the lack of a prehistoric context and until further evidence is available a prehistoric stone row interpretation seems the most probable because the nearest rows are of this form, namely long rows consisting of widely spaced stones.


Individual Stones

Plan of Blathaisbhal stone row showing the stones numbered for identification.

Stone 1 (Bottom)

At NF 88740 71717 stands 0.56 high and measures 0.32m long, 0.20m wide and is orientated at 170°.

Stone 1 View from north (Scale 1m). From this stone Lì a Tuath (on left) and Lì a Deas (on right) are obvious on the skyline.

Stone 2

At NF 88775 71706 stands 0.48m high and measures 0.83m long by 0.19m wide and is orientated at 110°.

Stone 2 View from north (Scale 1m). As you move up the row Lì a Tuath slowly disappears.

Stone 3 (Top)

At NF 88793 71696 stands 0.6m high and measures 0.43m long by 0.28m wide and is orientated at 72°.

Stone 3 denotes the upper end of the row. View from north (Scale 1m). From this stone the summit of Lì a Tuath is at the limit of visibility. 

Photographs

Looking north westward along the row. Stone 1 is in the foreground (Scale 1m).

The row is clearly not straight. View from the south east (Scale 1m). The Canmore article suggests that the row is parallel with the nearby boundary fence and may therefore be a land division boundary. It is clear that it is not parallel with the fence and the fact that it is not perfectly straight enhances a prehistoric interpretation as rows of this form and length are rarely straight.

View from east (Scale 1m).

View from south east (Scale 1m).

Access Information

Parking is available at NF 88745 72726. From here follow the track south to NF 88634 72351 and then follow the line of upright foot path marker posts up the hill until you reach the row.

Online Resources 

Megalithic Portal     Canmore

Other References

Burl, A., 1993, From Carnac to Callanish – The prehistoric rows and avenues of Britain, Ireland and Brittany, Yale University Press, New York and London, pg. 223.

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