Waun Oer

Copyright: Paul Blades. Original at Megalithic Portal.

Location

Wales Gwynedd Rest of Wales SH 61769 11303
Lat 52.68170665   Long -4.0462944

Plan of the Waun Oer stone alignment. Black stones are upright and others are recumbent.

Source: survey at 1:250 by Sandy Gerrard and Sophie Smith.

Characteristics

Type: Single Length: 78m
No. of stones: 10 Size of stones: Large, medium and small
Orientation: 65° Altitude: 268m
Upper end: – Lower end: –
Straight (Yes or No)  : Sea View: Yes
Context:  Prehistoric settlement, cairns and prehistoric trackway.
Notes:

Other Information

Public Access:  Yes
Land Status: Snowdonia National Park
Scheduled Ancient Monument: ME084

Identification

Category: Plausible. No doubts have been expressed regarding the prehistoric interpretation of this row.


Plan showing the letters allocated to each stone. 

Stone Heights

A = 0.05m   B= 1.44m   C= 0.19m   D= 0.43m   E= 0.07m   F= 1.57m    G= 0.12m   H= 0.8m   I= 0.2m   J=0.12m

Three stones remain upright and the others are recumbent. Stones A, E and J may represent fortuitous natural rocks whilst D and I have probably been moved. Stone D in particular appears to have been dumped upon Stone C. Evidence for historic stone clearance is provided by clearance cairns placed around three of the stones. The position of these cairns is shown below.

Plan showing the position of the clearance cairns (grey)  around Stones F, H and I.

Landmark Reveals

Extensive views of the sea are available from the Waun Oer stone alignment. Throughout its length the character of this view changes very little.  The reveal at Waun Oer is instead provided by the prominent Pared y Cefn Hir. At the western end of the row this distinctive hill is not visible,but comes into sight immediately as one starts to walk along the alignment.  Moving along the alignment Pared y Cefn Hir emerges further from behind the near hillslope. The character and precision of this reveal suggests that the Waun Oer stone row was positioned and orientated, at least in part, to create this visual treat.

View from Stone B at western end of row. Pared y Cefn Hir is hidden from sight.

 View from Stone D. Pared y Cefyn Hir has emerged from behind the hillslope.

View from Stone F. Pared y Cefn Hir is now clearly visible.

View from Stone H. A slight undulation in the near hill means less of Pared y Cefn Hir is visible.

View from Stone H. Pared y Cefn Hir emerges again.

At the eastern end of the row, the earlier glimpses are finally fully revealed.

Photographs

The western length of the stone alignment. View from east.

View from the east with Bardsey Island behind Stone F

Western length of the row with Llyn Peninsula beyond.

Stones B, D, E and F. View from above and east.

Stones B, D, E and F. View from above and north east.

The western length of the row. View from above and north east.

The western length of the row. View from above and east.

The western length of the row. View from north east.

View from west.

Stone B. View from south.

Stone B with Bardsey Island beyond.

Stone D. View from north east. The markings on this stone are mainly natural but a single circular hollow may represent a cup mark.

Stone F and historic clearance cairn. View from above and north.

Stones G and H and historic clearance cairn. View from above and north.

Recumbent Stone I. View from north.

Access Information

Road side car parking is available at SH 61663 11204. From here walk along the road leading north east for about 100m. Access to the field is via a gateway. The stones are visible from the gateway.


Online Resources 

Megalithic Portal     Modern Antiquarian     Coflein     Archwilio

Other References

Bowen, E.G. and Gresham C.A., 1967. History of Merioneth Volume 1, Dolgellau, pgs. 62.

Burl, A., 1993, From Carnac to Callanish – The prehistoric rows and avenues of Britain, Ireland and Brittany, Yale University Press, New York and London, pg. 225.

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