Stravanan Bay (Largizean)

Location

Scotland     Bute     Argyll & Isles     NS 08465 55361     Lat 55.753601   Long -5.053675

Plan of Stravanan Bay (Largizean) stone row. The grey stone is recumbent and was probably dumped here in recent years. (Source: survey at 1:100 by Sandy Gerrard).

Characteristics

Type: Single Length: 7.3m
No. of stones: 3 Size of stones: Only large
Orientation: 130° Altitude: 16m
Upper end: – Lower end: –
Straight (Yes or No)  : No Sea View: Yes
Context:  Stone circle
Notes:

Other Information

Public Access:  Yes
Land Status: –
Scheduled Ancient Monument: No

Identification

Category: Plausible. No doubts have been expressed regarding the prehistoric interpretation of this row.


Photographs

The stone row can be seen just to the right of the wind sock. From this angle the Isle of Arran appears to tower over the row. The high ground immediately behind the row however blocks this view of Arran from the row. According to Heywhatsthat.com the summit of Goatfell and other mountain tops should be at the limit of visibility, but at the time of the visit the low cloud prevented assessment of this. If future research demonstrates that the row is situated at the limit of visibility this would be significant and help explain why the row was built here tucked in below such a prominent ridge. 

View from the south (Scale 1m).

View from south west.

View from the south east with the sea beyond (Scale 1m).

View from the east.

Individual Stone Details

Plan of row showing height of individual stones.

Access Information

Car parking is available next to the Blackpark stone circle at NS 09156 55715. From here walk along the road to NS 08760 54995 and then follow the track leading north.

Online Resources 

Megalithic Portal     Canmore     Modern Antiquarian

Other References

Burl, A., 1993, From Carnac to Callanish – The prehistoric rows and avenues of Britain, Ireland and Brittany, Yale University Press, New York and London, pg. 222.

Ruggles, C.L.N., 1999, Astronomy in prehistoric Britain and Ireland, Yale University Press, New Haven and London, 198.

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