Escart

Escart

Copyright. Paul Blades. Original available at Megalithic Portal.

Location

Scotland     Argyll     Argyll & Isles     NR 84642 66796     Lat 55.846148   Long -5.4416214

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Escart canmore_image_SC01456416

Plan of the Escart stone row.  Source:  https://canmore.org.uk/collection/1456416

 

Characteristics

Type: Single Length: 15.2m
No. of stones: 6 Size of stones: Only large
Orientation: 24° Altitude: 30m
Upper end: – Lower end: –
Straight (Yes or No)  : No Sea View: Yes
Context:  –
Notes: Shown as a stone circle on 1867 OS mapping. One stone was removed when a wall was erected.

Other Information

Public Access:  No
Land Status: –
Scheduled Ancient Monument: Yes

Identification

Category: Plausible. Originally described as a stone circle by the Ordnance Survey, but current consensus is that this is the remains of a prehistoric stone row. The proximity of the row to farm buildings could be seen to detract from the prehistoric interpretation, but on balance and until further evidence is found it seems plausible that this row is prehistoric.


Photographs

The three southern stones. View from north (Scale 1m).

The two northern stones. A hole in the lower part of the stone on the left was probably drilled in preparation for its destruction. When the wall was constructed a sixth stone was removed. View from north west.

The five remaining stones. It is remarkable that this row has survived given the later use of the area as a farmyard. View from south west (Scale 1m).

View from above and south west (Scale 1m).

View from above and south (Scale 1m).

View from above and NNE looking along the row.

View from above and NNW looking along the row.

The sea view from the row.

Access Information

The stone row stands within a farm-yard and permission to visit should be sought. The owner is very interested, enthusiastic and knowledgeable. Permission to visit was readily given in March 2017.

Online Resources 

Megalithic Portal     Modern Antiquarian     Canmore     Historic Environment Record

Ordnance Survey

Other References

Burl, A., 1993, From Carnac to Callanish – The prehistoric rows and avenues of Britain, Ireland and Brittany, Yale University Press, New York and London, pg. 222.

Ruggles, C.L.N., 1999, Astronomy in prehistoric Britain and Ireland, Yale University Press, New Haven and London, 197.

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