3. Did you know that ….

Nearly half of all the stone rows in Great Britain are in South West England.

East Pinford stone row on Exmoor is one of 145 stone rows recorded in South West England.

Distribution of stone rows

10 comments

  1. SumDoood · · Reply

    I’m sure you’ll have a ponder-worthy answer ready for me, Sandy.

    I’ve been reading Robert MacFarlane on “sea roads” and am now wondering… Where stone rows have been found on the east side of Britain, are they near to locations where sailors from, say, Belgium – I’m thinking now about the Orkney vole – would have made landfall on their journeys (to and?), from Belgium to Orkney?

    Did they sail in good conditions clear across the Moray Firth from Fraserburgh to Helmsdale? Or even directly to the Hill o’ Many Stanes? Might the HoMS be showing us the broadly local sea roads as they might predictably(?) vary / have varied over the course of a year?

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    1. The relationship between the rows and the sea is something that has been explored in terms of visual links. The case for such a relationship is very strong with many rows some distance from the sea itself having restricted views. Hopefully the case has been made for Dartmoor. Concerning the east coast what is clear is that there are considerable lengths of that coast which have no stone rows. The largest concentration is in Caithness, but even here a significant number of rows are found well inland and of course the tradition of building multiple stone rows is not found in Orkney (indeed there it is fairly certain that there is no stone row building tradition on Orkney – but time will tell). In the rest of Scotland there are only a couple of rows that are close to the coast whilst in England there are a couple near the sea in North Yorkshire. Whilst perhaps not directly connected with your question I find it interesting that there are no rows east of Wales. Some of this is certainly the result of geology but it is certainly significant that there are no rows in some areas with stone circles and other megaliths. Sea travel was almost certainly involved in the spread of ideas associated with stone rows but the regional differences do imply that we are not simply seeing the spread of a single idea by groups of traders – as with all things stone rows it is more complicated than this. I have just finished an article looking at aspects of the distribution of rows. In the next couple of days I will link it to a post. In the meantime it can be found under Research Articles and is called Nearest Neighbour Analysis. I hope my answer is not too disappointing.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. SumDoood · · Reply

    No, it’s not. Perhaps I have no shame. I’m certainly prone to “typing out loud” and asking questions to which I don’t know the answers! If any of my question(s) might seem silly, I still feel that asking them is probably less silly than worrying about being the person who asked a silly question. Now I’m off around the www to find out if sea roads change and to what extent and when.

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    1. No silly questions from you. To the contrary really good ones that get one thinking. Many thanks.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. […] 3. Nearly half of all the stone rows in Great Britain are in South West England. […]

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  4. […] 3. Nearly half of all the stone rows in Great Britain are in South West England. […]

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  5. […] 3. Nearly half of all the stone rows in Great Britain are in South West England. […]

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  6. […] 3. Nearly half of all the stone rows in Great Britain are in South West England. […]

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  7. […] 3. Nearly half of all the stone rows in Great Britain are in South West England. […]

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  8. […] 3. Nearly half of all the stone rows in Great Britain are in South West England. […]

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