Featured Row – GARYNAHINE, CNOC FILLIBHIR MHOR

The closest row to the rows at Callanish is inevitably going to be a bit of a disappointment. Whilst the spectacular Callanish rows are visited by over a thousand people on many days of the year, the unimpressive, but nevertheless interesting row at nearby Garynahine, Cnoc Fillibhir Mhor probably receives a handful of visitors every decade. This is a timely reminder of the considerable variety in form and character which in itself is informative.
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2 comments

  1. SumDoood · · Reply

    What do you consider to be the significance of closed sea triangles?

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  2. The idea of sea triangles was first brought to my attention by Helen Woodley who had identified the phenononenon at chambered tombs. Closed sea triangles by their very nature are much less common than open sea triangles and in the context of stone row studies are more likely to alter size as you move along the row. If one accepts that the stone rows were positioned to acknowledge special places in the landscape, it is likely that the builders would have tried to incorporate rarer or perhaps special visual treats. I have still to look at the closed sea triangles on their own, but the article on the Dartmoor sea views ( https://stonerows.wordpress.com/research/sea-views/dartmoor-sea-views/ ) strongly supports the idea that sea views were one but certainly not the only consideration in the positioning of stone rows. As well as highlighting whether the sea view is open or closed it may also be fruitful to consider whether one or more promontaries and perhaps islands are included. I hope this helps. As you know this is very much a work in progress and all feedback is very much appreciated. Many thanks.

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